Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Is This Flag In Your Church?



I know sometimes I ask weird questions, but has anyone ever wondered about the origin of this flag and why it is in so many churches? I have seen this flag in two Pentecostal, several mainlines including a Lutheran, Anglican, Free Methodist churches, An Assembly of God church and many others, and even my fundamentalist independent baptist church had it standing in the corner. I mean this flag is all over the place!



Some of it's history is a bit dubious....

The Christian flag is one of the oldest unchanged flags in the world. It was conceived at Brighton Chapel, Coney Island, New York, Sunday, September 26, 1897, and was presented in its present form the following Sunday by its originator. Call it chance, or providence, serendipity, or the plan of God, on that day, the Christian flag was born. The white on the flag represents purity and peace. The blue stands for faithfulness, truth, and sincerity. Red, of course, is the color of sacrifice, in this case calling to mind the blood shed by Christ on Calvary, represented by the cross. The first pledge to the Christian flag was written by Methodist pastor Lynn Harold Hough in 1908. "I pledge allegiance to the Christian Flag and to the Savior for whose kingdom it stands. One brotherhood, uniting all mankind, in service and love."
The "One brotherhood, uniting all mankind" thing is a giant ,well, RED FLAG. It was designed by Charles C. Overton.

If all these different churches fly this flag, doesn't that speak of some type of ecumenical unity between them? [Many churches and folks including fundamentalist ones who fly this flag, are definitely ignorant of it's history]

Things get weird when folks are led to pledge to this flag like the American flag, what would God think of people pledging allegiance to a strip of cloth?

THE AFFIRMATION OF LOYALTY TO THE CHRISTIAN FLAG
The Affirmation of Loyalty to the Christian Flag is a sacred commitment. Let the congregation celebrate its loyalty to the Christian flag and the Cross which it bears by extending to it appropriate recognition and honor.

The minister or lay person will proceed as follows, saying:

1. Let us stand facing the Christian Flag.

2. Let us repeat the Affirmation of Loyalty in unison.

"I affirm my loyalty to the Christian Flag and to our savior whose cross it bears, one spiritual fellowship under that cross, uniting us in service and love."

3. Let each person conclude the Affirmation with a slight but positive nod to the Flag. The congregation may now sing one or more verses from a hymn of its choice, such as Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus, or other appropriate selection.

4. Let us now participate in our Christian Fellowship by holding hands in an inclusive chain from person to person and pew to pew during the concluding prayer. The minister or lay person presiding will offer here a brief appropriate prayer, marking the conclusion of this celebration of the Affirmation of Loyalty to the Christian Flag.


Some churches even dedicate songs to this flag...



One interesting verse, "And May It Reign Triumphant O'er Land and Distant Seas" at 2:08 on the video above.

At 2:16, it has the verse "And All the World United"

Of course this flag entices odd pseudo militaristic parades and processions [sorry about the music here, turn down the volume.




Here is another video, it seems some controversy came up in one community about this flag, with non-Christian veterans wanting it taken down from war memorial, this video shows more of the "one brotherhood" and "united world" messages.



Interesting how close in design the Episcopal church flag is...[which basically is the left daughter wing of the Roman Catholic church]



Is my theory that this flag is a Dominionist marker, that helps advance ecumenism and the whole false spirit of "Christian Triumphalism" where they desire to conquer THIS world for "christ" too far fetched? Tell me what you think.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

BB, the red cross was the emblem of the crusaders in their wars not only against the eastern people, but against the Saints. It is not the mark of Jesus Christ, but is Satanic in nature. It is utter ignorance for churches and their pastors to carry on such a vain tradition. Our banner is the Gospel:

4Thou hast given a banner to them that fear thee, that it may be displayed because of the truth. Selah. Ps. 60

And His banner over us is Love, for no more perfect love could He show than to die in our place to take His Father's wrath upon His own body. Anon. #1

Bible Believer said...

Thanks for that info anonymous, that may take more study, I wondered about the red color of the cross on that flag....I believe glorying a piece of cloth is definitely "vain tradition". You are right about our banner being the gospel.

Tyler Richards said...

I don't normally post on things like this, but i feel like i have to this time. Here are the facts:

The red cross is the oldest symbol, dating back to the third century. The white represents purity and the red, the bloo
d of the martyrs. The blue is ecclesiastical blue, light in color and used in the clothing of the Blessed Virgin Mary and, on this flag, represents the human nature of our Lord which he got from his virgin mother. The nine cross crosslets or Jerusalem crosses represent the nine dioceses that convened in Philadelphia in 1789, when the Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church was adopted. . . The nine cross crosslets are set in the form of a St. Andrew’s cross in memory of the fact that, to avoid swearing allegiance to the British Crown, Bishop-elect Seabury of Connecticut (the first bishop of the Episcopal Church) had to go to Scotland to be consecrated by Scottish bishops.” The large red vertical-horizontal cross, St. George’s cross, is in recognition of St. George, the patron saint of England, as Andrew is of Scotland.

Tyler Richards said...

The red cross is the oldest symbol, dating back to the third century. The white represents purity and the red, the blood of the martyrs. The blue is ecclesiastical blue, light in color and used in the clothing of the Blessed Virgin Mary and, on this flag, represents the human nature of our Lord which he got from his virgin mother. The nine cross crosslets or Jerusalem crosses represent the nine dioceses that convened in Philadelphia in 1789, when the Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church was adopted. . . The nine cross crosslets are set in the form of a St. Andrew’s cross in memory of the fact that, to avoid swearing allegiance to the British Crown, Bishop-elect Seabury of Connecticut (the first bishop of the Episcopal Church) had to go to Scotland to be consecrated by Scottish bishops.” The large red vertical-horizontal cross, St. George’s cross, is in recognition of St. George, the patron saint of England, as Andrew is of Scotland.